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An Interpretation of the English Bible by B. H. Carroll

This text is part of the SwordSearcher Deluxe Study Library.

Module type: Book
Module abbreviation: CarrollIEB


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B.H. Carroll's Interpretation of the English Bible

An Interpretation of the English Bible is a 17 volume study of the Bible by Benajah Harvey Carroll (1843-1914).

Interpretation is not a verse-by-verse commentary, but instead examines sections of Scripture in a manner uniquely suitable for use in classes and as a Biblical survey.

In SwordSearcher, Interpretation is presented in book form. Thanks to SwordSearcher's deep-referencing, Carroll's comments on any particular verse are quickly accessible via the Bible margin and Verse Guide, so you'll be able to instantly locate verse and passage commentary without having to select the associated book volume. This is especially useful since Carroll's commentary frequently spans non-continuous verse ranges.

And for those who want to read though the text as originally intended, the entire 17 volume set is right under the CarrollIBE tab in the Book panel.

From the General Foreword of the print edition—

An Interpretation of the English Bible, by Dr. B.H. Carroll, first came from the press of Fleming H. Revell Company in 1913. Revellís copyright was bought by Broadman Press in 1942. These volumes were edited by Dr. J. B. Cranfill, assisted by Dr. J. W. Crowder. In the meantime, it became apparent that the Interpretation was not complete: four volumes were yet needed to include the whole Bible. Dr. J. W. Crowder had in his possession the material of these volumes and at our request edited the following: IV, Poetical Books of the Bible; VI, Divided Kingdom; VII, Prophets of Assyrian Period; VIII, Prophets of Chaldean Period. For the first time, therefore, we are able to present the new and complete Interpretation of the English Bible, in seventeen volumes.

Of course, no one would be presumptuous enough to attempt to edit the body of Dr. Carrollís work; these volumes are valuable because of the undisputed position of the author in the minds and hearts of our Baptist people. We are leaving the long paragraphs as written; we are not disturbing references incorporating scientific statements which are now out of date, nor have we made any effort to eliminate repetitions or to bring the bibliography up-to-date.

As is known by readers of the earlier editions, this work is an interpretation rather than a commentary in the popular acceptance of the latter term. In such interpretation, the author indulges in paraphrasing the biblical text, in inserting now and then a sermon on a vital subject, and in sharing with his readers bits of humor which he has picked up along the way. After each chapter a lengthy list of pertinent questions is appended.

The reader finds Dr. Carrollís knowledge of the Bible positively amazing, and rejoices in his strict adherence to the objective with which he started: "We set out not to study human creeds, but the Bible, and we agreed to let the Bible interpret itself and mean what it wants to mean."

-John L. Hill

From the Introduction—

My theme is a thrilling one — THE ENGLISH BIBLE. The most natural construction of this topic calls for a history of the Bible in English from the earliest crude version in this tongue to the latest version, and for a summing up of the value of these versions in their traceable effect on our language and literature, on individual character, on the family, the unit of society, on business and commerce, on national policy, legislation and life, and on world evangelization, civilization and unity.

A less natural construction allows the more timely discussion of the value of a thorough study of the whole Bible in English by English-speaking people.

In expressing a preference for this less natural construction of the demands of the topic, I do not seek to disparage the interesting character and importance of the discussion as delimited by the first construction. No event in any nation’s history can be more momentous and far-reaching than the giving to them of the Word of God in their mother tongue and allowing it to be an open book at every fireside, with no page or promise or precept darkened by the proscriptive shadow of priest or state. The book is for the people themselves. It is God’s message to man and is addressed in all its sublime simplicity to the individual heart and conscience, obligating the personal responsibility of private judgment.

Contents by Volume:

  1. Genesis
  2. Exodus and Leviticus
  3. Numbers - Ruth
  4. The Poetical Books
  5. The Hebrew Monarchy
  6. The Divided Kingdom and the Restoration Period
  7. The Prophets of the Assyrian Period
  8. The Prophets of the Chaldean Period
  9. Daniel and the Inter-Biblical Period
  10. The Four Gospels, Part 1
  11. The Four Gospels, Part 2
  12. Acts
  13. James, Thessalonians, Corinthians
  14. Galatians, Romans, Philippians, Philemon
  15. Colossians, Ephesians, Hebrews
  16. The Pastoral Epistles; The Epistles of Peter, Jude, and John
  17. Revelation
 
 
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